Correct Beer

For several months we were all mildly tickled by a massive billboard advert we would pass on our way back from church each Sunday.

In astonishing simplicity it proclaimed “Correct Beer” in huge lettering beside a row of bottles. I was about to snap a picture but just before I did they changed the advert. (Fortunately Google is my friend and here we are:)

Why were we amused?

Because everyone knows (even our children) that the choice of beer isn’t a correct/incorrect kind of choice, but a preference. “Correct God” maybe, “Correct Answer” when you have claimed that 2+2=4, but not “Correct Beer”.

So then why was that phrasing chosen?

Taking note of how I have heard Nigerians use the word “Correct” it seems to be focussed less on a mathematical notion of rightness than on a general affirmation that something is good and praiseworthy. It’s not simply something that can be verified scientifically or a fact which is demonstrably true. And thus clothing which is smart might be described as “Correct Dress”. (I am often complemented by checkpoint soldiers/police on my wearing of “native dresses”, but that’s another story.)

In other words, “Correct” in this Nigerian English means something like “Best” in my own dialect and the praiseworthiness of the beer is just an assertion of the advertiser’s opinion. If in fact the choice of beer was a correct/incorrect matter, then really there would not have been so much need to advertise it; it would have been self-evident.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think there may be a link with this post on the idea of a ‘correct text’ and biblical inerrancy, but I haven’t explored that yet.

Stomach Infrastructure?!

Sometimes – and especially when crossing cultures and using languages of wider communication – I come across things that people have written where I understand all the words but haven’t the faintest notion about what is really meant. Here’s a prime example, from the Nigerian news site naij.com:

He said: “This year will be a year of the empowerment of our people. While we are doing projects, we will be doing stomach infrastructure.

“Our stomach infrastructure this year will go round the people. We will transform the state in all ramifications.”

A crazy autocorrect mistake? A Nigerianism? Politicianism? Or some jargon I have never come across? Suggestions and answers please below.

(Image courtesy WebMD)

 

Tech note: Upgrading a VMware Windows 7 installation to Windows 10

Ever since the Windows 10 upgrade was announced as free I have tried off and on to install it in a copy of my Windows 7 Virtual Machine (that I run on my Mac). At least I can get on with work and life while trying major OS upgrades that way. Unfortunately it’s not worked until finally I got somewhere today.

In short:
1. Switch your hard drives and DVD drive to IDE not SCSI.
2. Don’t worry if you missed the Windows 10 free upgrade deadline. Use your Windows 7/8 product key or the ‘assistive technologies’ upgrade.

For some reason VMware Fusion that I’m running defaults new Hard Drives to SCSI, though you can change the (emulated) connection type to IDE or SATA. It appears that Windows 10 doesn’t really like SCSI. Whenever I tried to install – either through ISO or running an upgrade assistant I got an error or else it would let me choose a keyboard layout then only give troubleshooting options and insist on shutting down or restarting the PC, without actually installing windows. Then it would revert to Windows 7, sometimes reporting error 0xc1900101 – 0x20017.

This turns out to be driver-related and probably was the SCSI issue.

Medals per Million

Update: as for 16 August 2016, Data from BBC, rio2016.com and Wikipedia:

17 August Medals metrics by GDP

Rank

Country

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Total

Popula–tion (M)

Medals per Million

Golds per Million

Medals per GDP $m

61 GRN

0

1

0

1

0.1

9.71

0.00

1000.00

36 ARM

1

3

0

4

3.0

1.34

0.33

371.26

40 GEO

1

1

3

5

3.7

1.34

0.27

358.63

19 JAM

3

0

2

5

2.7

1.84

1.10

355.69

48 FIJ

1

0

0

1

0.9

1.15

1.15

201.45

59 MGL

0

1

1

2

3.1

0.65

0.00

171.64

69 KGZ

0

0

1

1

6.0

0.17

0.00

165.84

69 MDA

0

0

1

1

3.6

0.28

0.00

164.37

22 CUB

2

2

4

8

11.2

0.71

0.18

160.23

48 KOS

1

0

0

1

1.8

0.54

0.54

154.54

54 AZE

0

2

3

5

9.8

0.51

0.00

142.28

48 BAH

1

0

0

1

0.4

2.65

2.65

112.15

12 HUN

6

3

4

13

9.8

1.32

0.61

110.42

37 BLR

1

2

2

5

9.5

0.53

0.11

108.96

18 CRO

3

2

0

5

4.2

1.19

0.72

100.14

30 UZB

2

0

4

6

31.6

0.19

0.06

97.33

16 KEN

3

3

0

6

44.2

0.14

0.07

92.75

38 SLO

1

2

1

4

2.1

1.94

0.48

91.34

20 KAZ

2

3

5

10

17.8

0.56

0.11

86.09

33 UKR

1

4

2

7

42.7

0.16

0.02

83.78

40 ETH

1

1

3

5

92.2

0.05

0.01

74.15

58 LTU

0

1

2

3

2.9

1.05

0.00

69.73

48 SER

1

0

0

1

14.8

0.07

0.07

68.62

43 BHR

1

1

0

2

1.4

1.42

0.71

66.49

14 NZ

3

6

1

10

4.7

2.12

0.64

58.85

69 EST

0

0

1

1

1.3

0.76

0.00

41.93

39 CZE

1

1

5

7

10.6

0.66

0.09

37.78

4 RUS

12

12

14

38

146.6

0.26

0.08

33.55

35 DEN

1

3

5

9

5.7

1.57

0.17

29.82

32 SA

1

5

1

7

55.7

0.13

0.02

26.29

69 TUN

0

0

1

1

11.2

0.09

0.00

22.73

43 SVK

1

1

0

2

5.4

0.37

0.18

22.27

42 ROM

1

1

2

4

19.9

0.20

0.05

21.98

27 GRE

2

1

1

4

10.9

0.37

0.18

20.56

9 AUS

7

8

9

24

24.2

0.99

0.29

19.99

7 NED

8

3

3

14

17.0

0.82

0.47

18.36

2 GB

19

19

12

50

65.1

0.77

0.29

18.11

24 COL

2

2

0

4

48.8

0.08

0.04

15.80

23 POL

2

2

3

7

38.4

0.18

0.05

14.78

21 PRK

2

3

2

7

25.3

0.28

0.08

13.01

6 ITA

8

9

6

23

60.7

0.38

0.13

12.44

8 FRA

7

11

11

29

66.7

0.43

0.10

11.77

34 SWE

1

4

1

6

9.9

0.61

0.10

11.70

25 BEL

2

1

2

5

11.3

0.44

0.18

10.75

11 KOR

6

3

5

14

50.8

0.28

0.12

10.60

31 IRN

2

0

2

4

79.5

0.05

0.03

10.36

48 PUR

1

0

0

1

10.3

0.10

0.10

10.03

43 VIE

1

1

0

2

92.7

0.02

0.01

9.93

27 THA

2

1

1

4

65.7

0.06

0.03

9.76

17 CAN

3

2

9

14

36.2

0.39

0.08

9.57

69 MOR

0

0

1

1

34.0

0.03

0.00

9.25

66 NOR

0

0

3

3

5.2

0.57

0.00

8.18

56 IRE

0

2

0

2

4.8

0.42

0.00

7.86

25 SWI

2

1

2

5

8.3

0.60

0.24

7.67

5 GER

11

8

7

26

81.8

0.32

0.13

7.50

15 BRZ

3

4

4

11

206.5

0.05

0.01

7.17

29 ARG

2

1

0

3

43.6

0.07

0.05

6.85

10 JPN

7

4

18

29

127.0

0.23

0.06

6.57

67 ISR

0

0

2

2

8.5

0.23

0.00

6.53

59 MAS

0

1

1

2

31.0

0.06

0.00

6.47

67 EGY

0

0

2

2

91.5

0.02

0.00

6.05

61 ALG

0

1

0

1

40.4

0.02

0.00

6.03

46 TPE

1

0

2

3

23.5

0.13

0.04

5.90

61 QAT

0

1

0

1

2.3

0.43

0.00

5.85

13 SPA

4

1

2

7

46.4

0.15

0.09

5.63

61 VEN

0

1

0

1

31.0

0.03

0.00

5.39

69 POR

0

0

1

1

10.3

0.10

0.00

4.88

1 US

28

28

28

84

324.2

0.26

0.09

4.53

3 CHN

17

15

19

51

1378.2

0.04

0.01

4.48

55 TUR

0

2

1

3

78.7

0.04

0.00

3.99

48 SIN

1

0

0

1

5.5

0.18

0.18

3.39

61 PHI

0

1

0

1

102.9

0.01

0.00

3.22

69 UAE

0

0

1

1

9.9

0.10

0.00

3.08

69 AUT

0

0

1

1

8.7

0.11

0.00

2.60

56 IDN

0

2

0

2

258.7

0.01

0.00

2.13

47 IOA

1

0

1

2

0.0

Yes, of course USA is top nation at the moment (in terms of Olympic medals) but it’s got a large population. Wouldn’t a fairer comparison be medals per head of population, or rather, per million. Here are the results sorted that way, as of 15 August 2016:

medals per head of population smaller Medals Per Million 15 August

It sounds odd when you put it like that… but actually it’s just how we say it

I spent the last week working with the Koro Ashe Translation team again. They are based 3 hours to the west but we worked this week in Jos. (If you receive news and prayer requests from Wycliffe.org.uk you might have heard mention of them as they are supported in particular by some British churches.)

IMG_1764

Some more interesting features of Ashe language came out in Luke 12, where Jesus says he has come not to bring peace but division. ‘Peace’ is expressed as ‘lying heart’ (that is, ‘restful mind’) which had me rather puzzled until it was explained. And where I was expecting a mother-in-law to pop up divided against her daughter-in-law, we ended up with ‘grandmother’. Ashe uses ingkoko ‘grandmother’ and then wife-of-her-son in this situation. That is one of those situations where it sounds odd in English, but everything is OK as far as the Ashe translation is concerned; they had done their job well. Merely translating the 3 English words ‘mother-in-law’ piece-by-piece would have been perplexing and meaningless and also not faithful to the original Greek.

Unexpectedly familiar: ‘Bean pods’ of Luke 15

Last week I made a discovery that surprised both me and the translation team I was working with: that the ‘bean pods’ the young prodigal of Luke 15 wanted to ‘fill himself with’ neither the generic food scraps we might think, or the sloppy grain-husk-porridge people feed pigs with here but were the fruit of a tree very familiar to us in West Africa.

To be fair we are not the first people to have made this discovery since the information was sitting in dictionaries and translators’ helps waiting to be uncovered, but the fact is we were all so sure we understood what the boy fed the pigs that we didn’t even consider it might be wrong. Continue reading Unexpectedly familiar: ‘Bean pods’ of Luke 15